Posted in DIY Tutorials

Fabric Covered Shoe Box

Saturday night I sat down to tape together a PDF sewing pattern and watch “Say Yes to the Dress.” Then I went into the junk closet for something and found a shoe box I had been saving because I thought it was good quality. I immediately switched over to crafting something out of said shoe box because my mind wanders a mile a minute and I can’t stick to one thing for very long. This led to me digging through my remnants of fabric and so on and so forth. In the end, all of this mad crafting resulted in this:

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(Please ignore the mess in the background. Shooting photos in a studio apartment is very hard.)

The supplies you need for this project are:

  • Sturdy shoe box
  • Fabric (Measure to make sure you have enough to cover your shoe box)
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Chalk
  • Mod Podge
  • Trim (optional)

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Place the top (or bottom, depending on which end you are working on) of the box on the fabric, making sure there is enough on all ends to cover the sides, and trace. Then, measure the height of the sides and add about 1/2″ to those measurements to fold over the edges of the box. In the end, you should have a piece of fabric that looks like this:

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(Unfortunately this is where my process photos end because I got so excited to finish this I neglected taking photos of each step. So hopefully words will do for the rest of this post.)

I then applied a thin coat of Mod Podge to the center of the fabric where I outlined the top (or bottom) and then placed the box on top accordingly. Do your best to make sure there are no bubble or creases. Then I applied a thin coat of Mod Podge to all sides and placed the fabric on top, again doing my best to make sure there are no bubble or creases. (I used a brocade so I still wound up with a lot of bubbles because I think the fabric seized up but it added a nice texture to it overall so it still worked out.) When it comes to the corners, tuck the raw edges in to get a nice, clean finish.

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Wait a half hour to an hour for that coat to dry. Then apply a top coat over the fabric and let that dry. The last coat I applied was on the inside of the box, on top of the fabric I had folded over the edge. I decided not to fold the raw edges over on the inside because I didn’t want it to become too thick and not be able to get the top of the box over the bottom anymore. With Mod Podge coating the raw edge, it shouldn’t fray and since it’s on the inside no one will see it!

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I decided the box needed a little something more. So I added some lace from my stash by applying a thin coat of Mod Podge to the bottom edge of the box top and then placed the lace on top. I used clothes pins to keep the lace in place as it dried. Once that coat was dry, I applied a top coat over the lace.

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For now, I think I will use this to hold some odds and ends in. But this project could also come in handy if you need a card box for a wedding or a shower. Just add a slit to the top using an X-acto knife.

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Posted in DIY Tutorials

Scrap Fabric Coaster Tutorial

I’m always looking for projects to make in an attempt to get rid of fabric scraps I don’t know what to do with. I feel so bad throwing fabric away because of it’s impact on the environment but haven’t been able to find a place that takes fabric scraps yet. So one day this past December, I came home from work early and an idea hit me. I decided to use some of the scraps (from what’s becoming a very overwhelming pile!) to make coasters as Christmas gifts this year. Here is how I made them.

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Supplies Needed:

  • Scrap fabric- (Ideally a stable woven of some kind. I used flannel to fit the winter season.)
  • 1/8″ thick sheet of cork (Tip- try to go to your local craft store if you can seeing as it’s about triple the price on Amazon to compensate for the free shipping that comes with Prime.)
  • Two circles to trace, one slightly smaller than the other. For my bigger circle, I used a container of dried cranberries that measures 4 3/4″ in diameter and for the smaller circle, I used the lid of a candle that measures 4″ in diameter.
  • Fabric scissors
  • Craft scissors
  • Chalk
  • Mod Podge
  • Cheap brush

 

  1. Iron your fabric (this will make it much easier to handle) and use the larger circle template to trace as many circles as you like, one circle for each coaster. Use your fabric scissors to cut them out.

 

2. Use your brush to apply a generous, but even amount, of Mod Podge to each circle and then press it onto your sheet of cork. Since the fabric was cut in the shape of a circle, the bias of the fabric may cause it to stretch and misshapen. Don’t worry about it though, this will be corrected later using the smaller circle template.

3. Let dry for 30 minutes. (The fabric absorbs the Mod Podge much more than paper would, which means more is needed and drying time is longer.)

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4. Apply generous, but even amount, of Mod Podge as a top coat. Let dry for one hour.

5. Cut out each circle.

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5. Use chalk to trace the smaller circle template onto the cork side of your coasters.

6. Cut coasters around new edge.

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This is what your coasters should look like when you’re all done! The only thing left is to get some ribbon and tie each set of coasters together to gift to a friend/family member or forget the ribbon altogether and keep them for yourself!

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I decided to include these in gifts for my Aunts and Uncles this Christmas along with a pretty mug from Anthropologie and some good ol’, classic Swiss Miss. I think they went over pretty well.

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